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James Wesley: Doing What Country Music Does, And Loving Every Minute Of It

Two weeks ago, the Broken Bow Label Group announced a very special event scheduled for this Thursday, June 7, at the Wildhorse Saloon.  ‘A Concert for Cystic Fibrosis’ is presented by SiriusXM The Highway, and will feature performances a number of country stars during the week of the CMA Music Festival.

The purpose of the event is to raise money for and awareness of the disease, with all of the proceeds of the evening benefitting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  Scheduled performers for this Thursday include Thompson Square, Randy Houser, Parmalee, Kristy Lee Cook, and James Wesley.

“This is exactly what country music is all about,” Wesley said earlier today.  “It’s all about helping each other out and making a difference in other people’s lives.  I’m honored to be apart of this, and I’m looking forward to helping out in any way I can to help raise money and awareness.  Let’s find a cure for this!”

For Wesley, these are the moments when he realizes he is exactly where’s he’s supposed to be, living out his dream as a singer/songwriter in Nashville.  And after years of trials and tribulations, things are falling into place for the Mound Valley, Kansas native.

We, in the music industry, hear many stories about aspiring musicians paying the dues, working the 9-5 jobs during the day and pursuing a music career at night.  And at times, these can become monotonous and redundant.  That is, until you come across a guy like James Wesley.  Having grown up in a community of about 200 people, and was first exposed to country music by his grandmother.  He moved to Eureka Springs, Arkansas to perform in a music/variety show in his late teens, where he also met his wife.

Then, in a move that could have come straight out of a Hollywood movie script, Wesley and his wife sold their home and most of their belongings and moved to Nashville.  In James’ words, he could lived in Arkansas forever, but he HAD to chase his dream…he chased it all the way to Music City.

While getting his feet wet in Nashville and in the music business, he picked up a construction job, which he held for five and half years.

“As cliché as it sounds, there really is something to be said about working an honest, hard day’s work and then getting a paycheck at the end of the week.  And that’s what I did.  I worked to pay the bills, and in “spare” time, I wrote songs, play gigs, and got to know a lot of talented people in the music business.”

Wesley began recording with songwriter Rodney Clawson and producer Dan Frizsell, and was later signed by Broken Bow Records.  His debut single on the label was “Jackson Hole,” followed by “Real,” “Didn’t I,” and most recently, “Walking Contradiction.”

“In a way, I think life, in general, is a walking contradiction.  I go out to the bar and drink on Saturday night, and then I’m one of the first people to church on Sunday morning.  I’m definitely a walking contradiction.  I think a lot of people can relate to this song.”

He’s right.  People are relating to his music, so much so that he is quickly becoming a hot up-and-comer on the country circuit.  Take the song “Real” for instance.  It can mean ten different things to ten different people.  We like country music because it’s the sound of the working class, of the church-goer, and of the partier.  James Wesley is all of those things, and music fans are quickly becoming aware of it.

In addition to his set during ‘A Concert For Cystic Fibrosis,’ James will be performing at the Riverfront Stage on Friday in the 11:00am hour during the CMA Music Festival, and will working hard as always, pushing new music and undoubtedly gaining more fans on the road this summer.

Click here for James’ full interview with Music City Encore.

Keep up to date with James online via his website, http://www.jameswesleymusic.com.  Follow him on Twitter and like him on Facebook. 

For information on Cystic Fibrosis, as well as how you can help, visit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation website at http://www.cff.org

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